KELSEY CASTING CALL: “White Christmas”

WhiteChristmas

M&M Stage Productions have announced auditions for their Winter 2017 Kelsey Theatre production of “White Christmas, opening December 2017 at The Kelsey Theatre! Wanna audition? Good! Here is everything you need to know!


SEE MORE: Black Males Needed for “Memphis”


This is a non-union, non-paid production.

About the Show

Based on the beloved, timeless film, this heartwarming musical adaptation of White Christmas features seventeen Irving Berlin songs and a book by David Ives and Paul Blake. Veterans Bob Wallace and Phil Davis have a successful song-and-dance act after World War II. With romance in mind, the pair follow a duo of beautiful singing sisters en route to their Christmas show at a Vermont lodge, which just happens to be owned by Bob and Phil’s former army commander. The dazzling score features well known standards including Blue SkiesI Love a PianoHow Deep is the Ocean, and the perennial favorite, White Christmas.

Audition Dates

Auditions and callbacks will be held in the Communications (CM) building adjacent to Kelsey Theatre. (On the campus of Mercer County Community College – 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor, NJ)

  • August 26th from 10am-4pm
  • August 27th from 10am-4pm

Production Company & Creative Team

  • Presented by M&M Stage Productions
  • Directed by John M. Maurer
  • Choreographed by Laura Murey Ghaffoor
  • Music Directed by Pam Sharples

Performance Dates & Location

  • All performances will take place inside The Kelsey Theatre at Mercer County Community College
  • Performance Dates:
    • November 17, 18, and 25, 2017, at 8 PM
    • November 18, 19, 25, and 26, 2017, at 2 PM
    • December 1 and 2, 2017, at 8 PM
    • December 2 and 3, 2017, at 2 PM

Rehearsal Information

How To Sign-up

  • In order to minimize wait times, audition appointments are very strongly recommended.
  • To make an appointment, CLICK HERE.

Audition Prep

THE ACTING

  • All auditioners will read for the production staff
  • Refer to Monologue List (below) to prepare appropriate monologue
  • Some auditioners will be asked to perform cold readings from the script

THE SINGING

  • All auditioners will sing for the production staff (piano accompanist provided)
  • Refer to character breakdown (below) to prepare appropriate song
  • Auditioners not singing from the musical’s score should bring sheet music in the correct key

THE DANCING

  • All auditioners will learn and perform a basic dance or movement routine
  • Dancers with tap experience will participate in a separate tap audition
  • Bring jazz shoes (or comfortable sneakers)
  • Bring tap shoes (or well-fitting shoes with hard soles)
  • Bring clothing appropriate for movement

Casting

All roles are open.

CHARACTERS:

BOB WALLACE (M, baritone, late 20s to early 40s) A major singing star, Bob is the guiding force behind Wallace and Davis. He wears his fame easily and is a born leader but has some social and romantic awkwardness that makes him endearing to the audience. A superb singer with a crooning style. Moves well. AUDITION SONG: Blue Skies (measures 75-89).
PHIL DAVIS (M, bari-tenor, late 20s to late 30s) The fun-loving partner in Wallace and Davis, Phil is a lady’s man and a clown. He is a wonderful friend and will partake in any scheme he can cook up in order to make sure his best friend is happy (especially when he has something to gain). He has a boyish charm and is also quite dashing. A song-and-dance comic performer. Strong jazz and tap required. AUDITION SONG: The Best Things Happen While You’re Dancing (measures 1-31).

BETTY HAYNES (W, mezzo-soprano, mid 20s to mid 30s) – Betty is the older and more sensible of the Haynes sisters. She has always taken care of Judy and is hesitant to leave her little sister alone, even though her chances for love and a career are on the line. She must have strong stage presence and a romantic side. A singer of quiet beauty and charm, Moves well. AUDITION SONG: Love You Didn’t Do Right By Me (measures 69 to end).

JUDY HAYNES (W, alto, early 20s to early 30s) The younger Haynes sister who is beautiful and ambitious. Judy knows how to use all of her feminine appeal to her advantage, be it spunk, charm, sex appeal, or outright flirting. Her scheming is always good-hearted and this powerhouse performer’s greatest role is that of a devoted sister. A major song-and-dance performer. Strong jazz and tap required. AUDITION SONG: any upbeat, spunky musical theater song that best shows vocal abilities (bring sheet music in correct key).

HENRY WAVERLY (M, late 50s to mid 70s) Strong stubborn military mind. Loyal. A retired army general who has taken up the simpler life of a Vermont innkeeper. Although he has the gruff exterior of a man who was career military, he is dignified, compassionate, and the ultimate heart of the show. Actor playing this role must make a strong audience connection and be loveable. Non-singing. Non-dancing. AUDITION SONG: any show stopper from a musical showing belt (bring sheet music in correct key).

MARTHA WATSON (W, alto-belter, late 40s to mid 60s) A retired Broadway star, Martha’s engagements have faded, but her star power hasn’t. The ultimate busybody and meddler, Martha now runs Henry’s life (despite his objections) and is the housekeeper at the inn. Must have wonderful comic timing and a larger than life on-stage persona. Appealing character-comedienne. Moves well. AUDITION SONG: any show stopper from a musical showing belt (bring sheet music in correct key).

SUSAN WAVERLY (W, child belter, 9 years old) Henry’s granddaughter who is utterly committed to him and entirely loveable. She is a smart and talented young lady who is wise beyond her years and represents the child’s perspective in the show. Strong minded, kind, and precocious. Moves well. Tap required. AUDITION SONG: I’m Happy Reprise or any musical theater song that best shows range of belt (bring sheet music in correct key.

RALPH SHELDRAKE (M, any voice types, mid 30s) A former army buddy of Bob and Phil’s, Ralph now works on The Ed Sullivan Show. He was the class clown in his army troupe and continues to maintain that personae even after the war. Strong jazz and tap required. AUDITION SONG: any musical theater song that best shows vocal abilities (bring sheet music in correct key).

RITA (W, any voice type, mid 20s to early 30s) A sassy showgirl who works with Wallace and Davis. Not the brightest bulb in the box but a lot of fun and a great dancer. Strong jazz and tap required. AUDITION SONG: any musical theater song that best shows vocal abilities (bring sheet music in correct key).

RHODA (W, any voice type, mid 20s to early 30s) A sassy showgirl who works with Wallace and Davis. Not the sharpest tack in the drawer but a lot of fun and a great dancer. Strong jazz and tap required. AUDITION SONG: any musical theater song that best shows vocal abilities (bring sheet music in correct key).

MIKE (M, any voice type, mid 20s to late 30s) A comic foil with a clipboard, Mike is the stage manager for Wallace and Davis. Mike has a flair for the dramatic that usually results in a laugh. Strong jazz and tap required. AUDITION SONG: any musical theater song that best shows vocal abilities (bring sheet music in correct key).

EZEKIEL FOSTER (M, mid 40s to late 50s) A handyman at the inn, Ezekiel is a good, old-fashioned New Englander who enjoys a slower pace in everything he does. This character will may adopt a Vermont accent. Strong jazz and tap required. AUDITION SONG: any musical theater song that best shows vocal abilities (bring sheet music in correct key).

ENSEMBLE (M &W, all voice types, late teens to late 50s) Chorus kids. Featured dancer ensemble made up of 4 men and 4 women. These performers are the troupe that travel in the Wallace and Davis show and are featured in multiple group numbers. They will fill many minor roles. Strong jazz and tap required. AUDITION SONG: any musical theater song that best shows vocal abilities (bring sheet music in correct key).

MONOLOGUE LIST 

Prepare the appropriate monologue below for the roles(s) for which you are auditioning.
If no monologue is specified for your role of choice, prepare any of the monologues below.

BOB WALLACE: Thanks, folks. You hear that song? “We’ll Follow The Old Man Wherever He Wants To Go.” We in the 151st division used to sing that to General Henry Waverly. And I’m here tonight with a call to the 151st. You see, the General could use some company this Christmas. I know it’s asking a lot, going to Vermont with your families for the holidays – but the way I remember it, that’s what Christmas is all about. A lot of us wouldn’t be alive today if it wasn’t for the General. So we’d be giving just about the nicest gift we could to the greatest guy we’ll ever know.

PHIL DAVIS: You wanna know why, Bob? I’m trying to find you a girl. Big ones, little ones, it doesn’t matter. As long as I can put a little romance in your life… Bob! I want you to go out and have some fun. Remember fun? I want you to stop being Bob Wallace Incorporated and fall in love! I want you to get married and have nine children, so you can have a home, and I can go out and get a massage or something! Look, Bob, just humor me, will you? Let’s see these girls perform tonight. Call it a favor for an old army buddy. We’ll go see Frankie’s freckle-faced sisters, maybe the weather’ll break, the skies’ll clear, and the love of your life will pop out of a puddle. I’ll go grab us a cab.

BETTY HAYNES: Wallace and Davis are here to see us? I don’t understand it …How did Wallace and Davis ever find out about
 Betty and Judy Haynes? It couldn’t have been Frankie. He’s in Alaska. How would he ever get to Wallace and Davis. Wait a minute… I smell a rat here. Maybe the same rat who told this club owner we’re his cousins. Judy, Did you ever hear about honesty being the best policy? Oh, honey, I do want you to succeed …We’re a twosome, remember? I don’t succeed if you don’t. But Judy, I don’t want to keep the act together through deception and… I don’t want you to keep it together because of me… Look, if you get an offer or find a really great guy, don’t worry about me. We are sisters. That will never change.

JUDY HAYNES: (Running into the room.) They are here! I told Jimmy to put them at a table right down front. I’m so excited. I hope I don’t stare at them during the number. Hurry, we have to get ready. (Betty doesn’t react.) Hey, snap out of it, Betty, We’ve actually got Wallace and Davis coming to see us. I don’t know how they knew we were here. They were in the army with Frankie. Maybe through Frankie… Yeah… I know Frankie’s in Alaska… Look you know that old saying about honesty being the best policy? Well I never believed it for a second. Don’t you want us to get someplace, Betty? Do you want to go on playing dives like this forever? If they like us, they might hire us. If they hire us, then we get noticed. If we get noticed, our careers are made. Snap out of it… It is time to get noticed.

HENRY WAVERLY: (To audience) So – Christmas Eve 1944. I don’t see any flying reindeer in this little corner of Hell tonight. Gentlemen, I do have some news for you. The army has ordered me stateside as of zero-one-hundred hours to get this German buckshot taken out of my leg. And if you don’t give the new CO as much as you gave Henry Waverly, I may come back and fight for the enemy. It has been my great privilege to lead you men. (Indicating various members of the audience.) Johnson. Sanchez. Rubenstein. Perelli. The 151st Division is doing America proud. Maybe in a year, we’ll be celebrating the holidays around a fire with our families and friends. Ten year from now – 1954 – who knows where we’ll be. Let’s pray it’s a better world. Soldiers – Merry Christmas.

MARTHA WATSON: You know, Mr. Wallace, there is a woman here in town. She not only sings and dances… (Wallace walks away.) Mr. Wallace, this local woman who was in show business… Well… She was in Walter Winchell’s column 15 times… Sardi’s put her picture up in the ladies’ room. Ethel Merman once said to her, in the wings at the Bellmount, she said, “Honey, you are loud.” And you know how loud that woman was. They called me Martha “The Megaphone” Watson! Yeah… I might have had six flops in a row on the Great White Way. But I stopped the show in “Whoopdedoo.” And You don’t learn that, sweetie. You’re born with it. Now stand back and get your ear muffs ready… I am going to show you why they call me “The Megaphone!”

SUSAN WAVERLY: Mr. Davis! Mr. Davis, can I be in the show? I’ve been watching, and it doesn’t look too hard. You can call me “Susan” or “Susie.” That’s just fine… (Gets idea.) Or if you want, you can call me “Broadway Sue.” So Mr. Davis, can I be in the show? I do have a history report to write, but that can wait. I have show business in my blood! And don’t forget that this is my grandfather’s barn. So I am not only a performer… I am a producer… (Thinks a moment.) What does a producer really do? My mom says, “Anything they want.” But she still makes me do my homework. And I spent all this time on my costume. A fat lot of good it did me. Well. I’ll just go to my dressing room and have a scene. (Exits.)

RALPH SHELDRAKE: (On phone.) Martha, this is Ralph Sheldrake in New York. Would you pass on a message to Bob Wallace for me? Just tell him our secret scheme is going great. I can’t give you the details but it’s all about this inn up there. Yeah… The Columbia Inn. Here’s the deal: the company is ready to come up and take it over – Christmas Eve. That’s right, the company is taking over the inn. The whole division’s been alerted. The old man’ll never know what hit him. Say this to Bob. Quote: This is a million-dollar proposition. Don’t worry, Bob’ll know what I mean. And say, Martha, keep this on the q.t., will you? Great! You’re a peach!

RITA/RHODA: Oh, Philly-dilly! Funny bumping into you here. You know, it’s a good thing I forgot my woolens. Given how sultry it is up here. As if it ain’t hot enough with Philly-dilly around. I was hot all the way up just thinkin’ about you, Phil. But it ain’t the heat… It’s the humidity! Oh Pardon my innuendo. So Philly… Once we’re in Florida, are we gonna work on that new quote-unquote “routine?” That last routine did wonders for my sacroiliac. Well, see ya in Florida! I’ll be the one wearin’ next to nothin’. And remember. Use Oxydol!… For purity! (Laughs on exit.)

MIKE: Hey, you guys! All right, people, calm down! People, people, calm down, calm down! I’ve got rehearsal schedules for the chorus. I’ve got three sets of scene breakdowns. They’re labeled A, B, and C. Let’s pass them out …Come on, people, we need to work together, people. This is not Just any show. Do you realize we are attempting to stage a Broadway extravaganza in five days? And that the stage manager’s office is a pigsty? And I mean a real sty with an actual pig! …Can I get this drop lifted? The dancers need room to work. (To himself.) Put on a show in five days? Why not. They say God took a week. Okay, all you Christmas elves! Get back in the toy shop! Hurry… Five days, people. We can do it… If we stay calm. (Gets startled and Screams.)

How To Sign-up

  • In order to minimize wait times, audition appointments are very strongly recommended.
  • To make an appointment, CLICK HERE.
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